New Stories


Bullmastiff from a 1952 French magazine cover, which referred to it as “the dog of the future.” But in breeding for the time and place in which they live, are breeders irrevocably changing the breed’s fundamental character?

A Delicate Balance

While I was at school, I had two burning ambitions: One was to own a Bullmastiff and the other was to have a Bull Terrier with my own affix. For as long as I can remember, we had show dogs in our home, and to us, there was only one type of Bull Terrier: the white, dome-faced, very jaunty creature evolved by James Hinks in Birmingham, England, more than a century ago. Many of them were deaf, in common with the now extinct English White Terrier, and there had been a move to breed “colored” English Bull Terriers using their close cousin, the Staffordshire Bull Terrier.

Tibetan Mastiff Bodhi and friend

Gentle Guardians

Semillas de Amor ("Seeds of Love"), a privately funded orphanage in Guatemala, is home to 23 children, ranging from five to 12 years old - and three Tibetan Mastiffs whose life work is to protect, guard and comfort them.

Pier Giovanni Staderini and friends

Mastino Master

Tuscan painter and ceramicist Pier Giovanni Staderini has a  far-ranging style, from abstract works to curvaceous studies of the female form that are as brooding as they are sensuous. The Neapolitan Mastiff occupies a special place in his heart – and on his easel. 

Cage Syndrome

British royals were among the first to own these exotic and ferocious Tibetan souvenirs, and when it came time to house them, zoological parks seemed as logical a place as any.

The "B" Word

Bloat is a life-threatening condition that needs to be treated immediately if a dog is to survive. Veterinarian and Bullmastiff breeder Sandra Statter offers advice on slowing its progression until you can get to the vet.

Origin of "The Eye"

Sherlock Holmes and Dick Tracy, Quincy and Kojak: Popular culture is stuffed with images of the tireless detective, gumshoeing his way into danger and intrigue.  

But those fictional sleuths have nothing over the world’s first real private detective, Allan Pinkerton.  

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