History

Early Bullmastiff Osmaston Turk
A splendid specimen. Osmaston Turk. Weight 120 lbs. Dam, Old Nell, half Bloodhound, half Mastiff. Owned by Mr. Biggs.
Originally appearing in 1911, this article argues the virtues of the fledgling Bull-Mastiff, even as the Mastiff was on the wane.
Jack the Mastiff at his "Snoring Grounds"
In 1899, this Mastiff from Maine became an official military mascot during the Spanish-American War, ranking him among the first documented war dogs in American history.
Kachook in New York -- a long way from his native Afghanistan.
Kachook in New York -- a long way from his native Afghanistan.
The story of Beislers Kachook is the story of Jerry Beisler – music producer, show promoter, hash smuggler, cannabis cultivator and compulsive traveler.
Arthur Craven was the first to write a book about the "Bull-Mastiff," though he never once lived with the breed.
Arthur Craven was the first to write a book about the "Bull-Mastiff," though he never once lived with the breed.
With the help of Italian fancier Nicola Mille, we canvas history for an explanation as to how France’s ancient herding dog, the Beauceron, might have sidled its way into the Cane Corso gene pool.  
Three decades ago, a Nepalese-bred Tibetan Mastiff named Tü-Bo set the standard for the breed throughout Europe. Today, however, he has been all but forgotten.
Marie Moore at High Hope Farm in 1958. The Mastiffs are brothers Rhinehart and Falcon of Blackroc. Photo courtesy of Joan Turner Moore
Marie Moore at High Hope Farm in 1958. The Mastiffs are brothers Rhinehart and Falcon of Blackroc. Photo courtesy of Joan Turner Moore
Marie Moore helped re-establish the Mastiff in 20th Century America. But she remains an enigma to many.
The author with her first homebred Tauralan Ruby Tuesday, circa 1974.
The author with her first homebred Tauralan Ruby Tuesday, circa 1974.
Longtime breeder Carol Beans of Tauralan Bullmastiffs looks back over four decades in the breed – and shares her thoughts on what the future might hold.
Cane Corsos got ready for their closeups when the television series "The Borghias" needed some canine gladiators to film a 15th-Century chase scene.
Cane Corsos got ready for their closeups when the television series "The Borghias" needed some canine gladiators to film a 15th-Century chase scene.
The Battle of Agincourt
The Battle of Agincourt.
Legend has it that Sir Piers Legh II was wounded at the battle of Agincourt in 1415, and his loyal Mastiff stood over him for hours while the battle raged.

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